We have put together a selection of training videos that we thought would be helpful for our competition students.


Click on one of the following to see a related video.

Foundation Exercises

This is a collection of foundation exercises that all levels of competition dogs should have…be it 5 months old or 5 years old.

Platforms

This video is about how you can use the platform to teach new behaviours to your puppy or dog. It is a way to teach your dog how to do something right the first time and to ensure he learns from positive, clear, errorless training. Plus most dogs find platform work fun and motivating so it becomes something they want to do and not something they have to do. I use the platform to help me teach the dog signals without movement, tricks, fronts, finishes, the stand and stand for exam, and go outs. You may come up with even more ideas! Once the behaviour is fluent on the platform I will then do the behaviour on the platform, and then off the platform and expect the same criteria as when on the platform. Most dogs are successful but if you have problems then get a yoga mat and place that on the ground and then make that smaller and smaller. You are looking for confidence in your dog doing the behaviour and no movement forward or backwards. Have fun!

How To Make A Platform

Build a Platform Method 2 (PDF)

Fronts

I like to start this process by sitting on a swivel seat that is placed on a 5 gallon bucket. My first step is to teach my dog that there is food in my mouth and that he can learn to catch it. So I will show the dog or puppy with two hands that I am placing food into my mouth while I am sitting on the bucket, I will make blowing noises so it keeps the dog focused upwards while my hands go to my sides, then I will spit to food to my dog, and say “get it”. Do this until your dog or puppy can catch the food, or, understands where the food is coming from. This procedure is setting your “focal point” where you want your dog to look when they are coming in to front position. You can also teach them how to catch in the house, throwing popcorn is a good step to take and they enjoy the game. Once that is established, you can start to throw the food off to the side and then encourage your dog into front position. I prefer to keep my hands at my sides (when my dog is returning to me and fronting) and use blowing noises to encourage the dog to look up at my face. One thing that SO many people get hung up on is using their hands to guide the dog into front position, and in turn the hands become part of how the behaviour is done and it is difficult to convince the dog otherwise when you try to remove your hands from the picture, i.e. muscle memory sets in. Sitting on a bucket is the best place to start this as your face is not far from the dog and they can connect easier than when you are standing. I do not teach small dogs to look at my face, it is to far up and they tend to sit away from you in front position so they can see your face. Small dogs have a lower focal point, perhaps my waist area or my knees depending on the size of the dog. Make throwing the treat fun, it will keep your dog enthusiastic and wanting to keep trying, and in turn, fronts can be fun and not a boring, drilling process. The video shows how I use my legs as chutes for the dog to learn how to come in straight, and I am also introducing off angle fronts at this time. This is part one of a video series I will be releasing on how I teach fronts. I hope you enjoy the learning process,

Walk Back

Walk back is a great skill to have that will compliment your obedience training. I use it as a fun trick, as a way to move my dog back if they come forward on a signal or position change cue and also drop on recall. It is a relatively easy skill to teach. This demo is with my 4.5-month-old puppy Seven. I like to shape this exercise by teaching my dog to seek to putting his hind feet onto a mat that is textured a raised platform or folded towel, something that feels different than the floor surface they are on, when their back feet hit that target they know they have reached their destination. Once the skill is taught the mat can easily be removed and you just mark once your dog has backed up far enough. To build distance and your dog being able to walk back in a straight line, I will lay chutes on either side with baby gates, gutters, etc. and have their mat at the end. I start at the end of the cute, walking my dog over the mat and reinforcing the hind feet on the mat. Then I start to move into the chute and asking for short increments going back until I have my dog going back thru the entire distance of the chute. Have fun training this exercise!

Off, Standby and Working Modes

This clip shows an important skill set that I feel is integral for all dogs to learn. Whether you do obedience, rally or agility, your dog will benefit from being taught this. I elaborate more on this skill set in my Relationship Building and Ring Entrance DVD. Is this something that you have instilled in your training program? If not you are missing out on a very important step of clarity for your dog.

Treat Bag

In this video clip I am using a TREAT BAG, which is not a bait bag! A treat bag does not clip onto your clothes. It is designed specifically with a soft nylon material which is mesh at the bottom so the smell of the treat can easily penetrate out. The top has a velcro strip to keep the bag closed and a tab on either side for easy opening. We are now carrying these treat bags designed specially for Janice Gunn at www.tntkenels.com. The treat bag will ensure your dog can get used to a distraction while training, without being able to reward themselves without your permission, as a toy, food bowl, or cookie on a plate could do. The treat bag reward is given by me, altho I may encourage my dog to pick up the bag and bring it to me so we can celebrate the training victory with a yummy treat from the bag, something we do together, helps to build a stronger relationship with your dog. This video shows just a sampling of things I can do with the treat bag. Use your own imagination, be creative and have fun!!!  We sell treat bags at TNT $12

The Pot

I use “The Pot” to teach a young puppy, or adult dog how to use their rear. The pot keeps the front feet in place, so that they can maneuver their rear easily and without confusion. The Pot training transfers extremely well to helping your dog to understand front position and also heel position!

Pot Training for Body Awareness
I use “The Pot” to teach a young puppy, or adult dog how to use their rear. The pot keeps the front feet in place, so that they can maneuver their rear easily and without confusion. The Pot training transfers extremely well to helping your dog to understand front position and also heel position!

Why “The Pot” Training Helps…

    • the dogs really enjoy this exercise
    • the method is easy to teach
    • it helps to improve your dog’s balance
    • teaches your dog how to use his rear
    • keeps your dog supple and limber
    • helps to maintain rear/back muscles
    • use it for a prelude to side-stepping
    • use it for a prelude to doing fronts
    • helps to teach your dog to find and learn heel position

Finding the Right Pot

Your pot needs to have a non-slip surface on the top, 2 – 3 inches high, it can be round or square, with just enough width to it so your dog can turn and move his front feet comfortably, yet not too wide as you want to teach your dog to keep his front feet under him. Make sure that your pot is solid and does not give under the weight of your dog. The idea sprouted from agility trainers whom use a large round ball that their dogs learn to balance on.

Getting Started Training with the Pot

You will find training the pot alot of fun. First just reward the slightest achievement. For example, encourage your dog onto the pot, even if they just touch the pot, reward that to start. I had one dog that simply would not put one foot on the pot, so I gently put one of her feet onto the pot, said YES, and rewarded. This was enough to give her the confidence to try it herself and from there, she started to offer two paws up.

Don’t get frustrated if your dog doesn’t understand what you want right away, just take it one paw at a time and keep it fun!

Sparks Puppy Training

This video is about Sparks 8 week old puppy training.  I am teaching him in the presence of his food bowl and he is learning to work and ignore the food bowl which takes ALOT of impulse control for an 8 week old puppy.  It shows that you can easily do this with persistence &  patience and allowing the puppy to make the choice to ignore it without the use of compulsion or No reward markers, which I do not care to use.  I show a sample of some of the early foundation exercises I am teaching Sparks.  I have a DVD called Positive Puppy, which explores more exercises for your young puppy or adult dog.

Food Chase Game

This video is about Sparks 8 week old puppy training.  I am teaching him in the presence of his food bowl and he is learning to work and ignore the food bowl which takes ALOT of impulse control for an 8 week old puppy.  It shows that you can easily do this with persistence &  patience and allowing the puppy to make the choice to ignore it without the use of compulsion or No reward markers, which I do not care to use.  I show a sample of some of the early foundation exercises I am teaching Sparks.  I have a DVD called Positive Puppy, which explores more exercises for your young puppy or adult dog.

Obedience Position Changes

This video is about Sparks 8 week old puppy training.  I am teaching him in the presence of his food bowl and he is learning to work and ignore the food bowl which takes ALOT of impulse control for an 8 week old puppy.  It shows that you can easily do this with persistence &  patience and allowing the puppy to make the choice to ignore it without the use of compulsion or No reward markers, which I do not care to use.  I show a sample of some of the early foundation exercises I am teaching Sparks.  I have a DVD called Positive Puppy, which explores more exercises for your young puppy or adult dog.

Finger Follow

This video is about Sparks 8 week old puppy training.  I am teaching him in the presence of his food bowl and he is learning to work and ignore the food bowl which takes ALOT of impulse control for an 8 week old puppy.  It shows that you can easily do this with persistence &  patience and allowing the puppy to make the choice to ignore it without the use of compulsion or No reward markers, which I do not care to use.  I show a sample of some of the early foundation exercises I am teaching Sparks.  I have a DVD called Positive Puppy, which explores more exercises for your young puppy or adult dog.

Finger Follow (PDF)